Losing Touch

I have a friend who lost her phone recently, which deeply upset her, however it was not because of the physical value of the phone. Instead, it was because she felt lost and empty without it. When I heard this, I realised how much we have become attached to some inanimate objects that if we lose them then we will feel like we have lost a friend.

After I heard her story I couldn’t even imagine how I would feel if I lost my phone. I don’t have a particularly amazing phone and I’m even thinking of getting a new one soon, however I think it’s the sentimental value of what is stored on it and also the uncertainty of what I would do without it that makes me feel uneasy. I’ve actually even had dreams of losing my phone before, which is probably quite extreme, but they never end well.

I think our attachment to our phones is quite easy to explain. A lot of people spend a large proportion of their time on their phone every day. It is very rarely a couple of metres away from us and we check on it every so often. The previous sentence could be said by a mother about her baby, and so I think we can develop a similar type of relationship with our phone even though it’s not a living thing that depends on us; it’s the other way around in fact.

Some people would say that it’s unhealthy to develop such a dependent relationship with our phones. I just know that my life would be a lot more difficult without one. I will always remember one time when I was going home from a friend’s house, where I had never previously been. It was late at night and I needed to catch a couple of buses to get home, however halfway through the journey my phone ran out of battery. I desperately tried to read the map and timetable at the bus stop to try to find a route to get me home, however as I didn’t have a watch I didn’t even know how long I had to wait until the next bus would arrive. I somehow made my way home that night, however I know that if my phone had been working then it would’ve told me everything I needed to know without even requiring me to think.

I guess my story shows the good and bad side of being dependent on a phone. The positive side is obviously making our lives easier, and also giving us a reassurance that help is in our pocket if we ever need it. The negative is that we think less and observe the world around us less. We could travel every day on public transport and not even know how to read a bus or train timetable.

Someone found my friend’s phone in the end, however she was not as happy as I thought she would be. After she lost her phone she thought she would never see it again, and so she spoke to some mobile network providers and had prepared to buy a new phone, which was better than her old phone and on a better plan. I’m not saying that what she did and how she now feels is wrong, but it shows that the weakness with our relationship with objects is that as it can become the most important thing in our life, it can just as quickly be forgotten and replaced by a newer version.

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